Laura Heather Smith – Extended Major Project

Extended Major Project: Animal-Human Hybrids

Aims and Learning Outcomes

 Aims:

A1 To provide you with the opportunities to exercise and enhance your knowledge and abilities in the development of a body of creative and technically competent work appropriate to your course aims and criteria at Level 6.

A2 To provide opportunities for you to learn from the increased complexity and rigour of creative production required for this unit.

A3 To encourage you to apply the advanced level of discipline and time-management which are required during the unit.

A4 To encourage you to work independently, albeit with supervision, in the development of your work, in a way which reflects contemporary professional practice. You are also encouraged to work effectively as a team member where this is demanded by your project or subject specialism.

Learning Outcomes (On completion of this unit you will be able to):

LO1 Demonstrate the ability to rigorously apply specialist knowledge, understanding and creativity in the production of your extended major project.

LO2 Demonstrate the ability to manage the complexity of practice demanded by the extended major project by managing your time and work efficiently.

LO3 Demonstrate ability in the coherent use of various representation techniques, documentation and presentations to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

LO4 Demonstrate your awareness of the ethical, social and cultural issues appropriate to the concept of a responsible professional practitioner, whether working independently or as part of a team.

Advertisements

Research Plan

– Animal Evolution (r)

– Human Evolution (r)

– Films about animal human hybrids (r)

– Any fictional books/tales/comic books written about animal human hybrids (r)

– Examples of make-up/makeup artists who have created animal human hybrids (p1)

– Exotic animals, bright colours. (p1)

– Artists/photographers that look at vivid colours (p1)

– Psychology of what colours people find attractive (p1)

– PETA and animal cruelty (r)

– Different animal species (r)

– Research into each species I’m looking at and how they are seen in different cultures. (r)

– Animals in horror films, horror research (p2)

– maquette/creature bust artists (p2)

Experimentation Ideas:

– rough sculpts on white bust for each species – 3 of each. (Colour on GIMP) (p1)

– sketches (p1 and 2)

-technical drawings (p1 and 2)

– Texture experiments using life form to take casts of things, sculpting small flat pieces and texturing/painting them (p1)

– small scale maquette (colour on GIMP) (p2)

– small scale bust (Colour on GIMP) (p2)

[ONE OF THE ABOVE WILL BE MOULDED AND CASTED]

– experiment of silicone skin backfilled with foam. (p2)

Learning Proposal

Name:                        Laura Smith

Course:                     BA (Hons) Make-up for Media and performance

Unit Title:                   Extended Major Project

Reference:              MSE603

Credit Points:            60

Weighting:                4.0

Hours of Study:       600

UNIT LEADER:          Sara Taylor

 

 

Proposal:

 

The Extended Major Project theme is based around animal-human hybrids, and this project will be split into two parts: the first part of the project consisting of a bigger workload compared to the second part of the project (LO2). Both parts of the project will be presented through an online blog.

The aim of the first part of the project is to produce four make-ups of animal-human hybrids, which involve collaborative work with a photographer from the shoulders up, to create a collection. The make-up will consist of a combination of prosthetic appliances and headpieces as found appropriate, and the four designs will be based around different animal species – bird, mammal, reptile and insect. The combination of prosthetics and headpieces will be challenging, as past projects have generally been prosthetic based only. Moreover, the look of the creatures are going to emphasise the representation of what people find attractive, through different colours and textures and therefore a lot of research will go into colours and paint jobs that are appealing to look at. (LO3)

The aim of the second part of the project will be to produce either a silicone maquette or bust of an animal-human hybrid that is more animal orientated than human. Rather than being quite pleasing to the eye, this creature is going to be based more around the horror genre, creating a contrast between the two parts of the project. (LO1, LO2, LO3)

Both parts of the project will enable a vast range of technical skills, such as sculpting, mould-making, casting, painting and constructing original headpieces. Problem solving will be a constant occurrence throughout the project, and this will be overcome through experimentation and research, prior to making the final pieces, and also during. (LO1, LO2)

In regards to ethical, social and cultural issues (LO4), the topic of animals can be linked to animal cruelty and experimentation, particularly with the second part of the project. Using four different species of animals will enable research into the origin of the species and how they are treated in different cultures. The evolution of animals and humans will also be explored, including research on theorists such as Richard Dawkins and Charles Darwin, as well as the idea of Anthropomorphism – the attribution of human characteristics to other animals.

At the end of the project, a 2500 word evaluation will be written based around the overall outcome of the project – what did and didn’t work and why, what could have been changed, and how the project could be extended even further, and how the project has a whole has aided my on-going development as a professional special effects make-up artist. (LO1, LO2)

 Aims:

 A1     To provide you with the opportunities to exercise and enhance your knowledge and abilities in the development of a body of creative and technically competent work appropriate to your course aims and criteria at Level 6.

A2     To provide opportunities for you to learn from the increased complexity and rigour of creative production required for this unit.

A3     To encourage you to apply the advanced level of discipline and time-management which are required during the unit.

A4       To encourage you to work independently, albeit with supervision, in the development of your work, in a way which reflects contemporary professional practice.  You are also encouraged to work effectively as a team member where this is demanded by your project or subject specialism.

 

Learning Outcomes (On completion of this unit you will be able to):

LO1  Demonstrate the ability to rigorously apply specialist knowledge, understanding and creativity in the production of your extended major project.

LO2  Demonstrate the ability to manage the complexity of practice demanded by the extended major project by managing your time and work efficiently.

LO3  Demonstrate ability in the coherent use of various representation techniques, documentation and presentations to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

LO4  Demonstrate your awareness of the ethical, social and cultural issues appropriate to the concept of a responsible professional practitioner, whether working independently or as part of a team

TRANSFERABLE SKILLS:

–       Managing Self through organising a project that has been split into two parts.

–       Teamwork through collaborating with a photography student.

–       IT skills through creating a blog to log the progress of the project.

–       Technical prosthetic skills such as sculpting, mould-making and casting.

Assessment Requirements:

–       Log of progress of project, which will be presented in an online blog.

–       A photographic collection consisting of four animal-human hybrid make-ups produced using a combination of prosthetics and headpieces.

–       A silicone maquette or bust that has been painted and hair punched (if appropriate).

–       2500 word evaluation.

100%


Each assessment requirement must be passed at a minimum grade of 40% to successfully complete the unit.

 Assessment Criteria:

Assessment Criteria (specific criteria related to the learning outcomes and linked to the statement of generic assessment criteria matrix):

Evidence of realisation through the application of technical knowledge and skills – Specialist knowledge and understanding are evident and applied in the work. (LO1)

Evidence of understanding through critical evaluation and reflection – Informing the development and management of the project. (LO2)

Evidence of realisation through presentation – The communication and presentation of ideas reflects best contemporary practice. (LO3)

Evidence of knowledge of concepts, contexts, criticism and theory – The work demonstrates awareness of concepts relevant to the responsible professional practitioner. (LO4)

Reference Material

–       Cottrell, S. (2008). The Study Skills Handbook. Palgrave Macmillan.

–       Nielsen, C. (2001). Animal Evolution: Interrelationships of the Living Phyla. OUP Oxford.

–       Dawkins, R. (1994). The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of Human Evolution. Cambridge University Press.

–       Darwin, C. (2006). The Origin of Species: 150th Anniversary Edition. Signet Classics; Rep Anv Edition.

–       Debreceni, T. (2009) Special Effects Make-Up for Stage and Screen: Making and Applying Prosthetics. Focal Press.

STUDENT……………………………………….DATE………………..

 

TUTOR…………………………………………..DATE……………….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anthropomorphism

“We are animals, we think animals. What could be more natural?” (Daston, L. and Mittman, G. (2005) Thinking with Animals: New Perspectives on Anthropomorphism. Columbia University Press.

Anthropomorphism is the existence of human characteristics found in other animals and non-living things, as well as many others, that are depicted as creatures with human motivations. It is included in many different forms of art, from film and television characters to art and storytelling, where it’s original roots come from. As there are so many different categories that the subject of Anthropomorphism falls under, I will divide these into sub-categories and look at each in more detail.

Mythology:

Anthropotheism

Anthropomorphism within mythology is finding human characteristic in religious figures and devine beings (better known as Anthropotheism). A key example of this is within Greek Mythology and the Greek Gods who had human qualities to them – the Gods fell in love, married, had children, celebrated and commiserated, much like their human worshippers. Further more some of the Gods represented human concepts such as love and war, and of course, there are also demi-gods, who are actually part human.

[click below to view gallery]

 

As shown in the gallery above, each Greek God or Goddess has at least one human attribute from marriage and children, to an ability with crafts, and even the subject of the dead arises within these characteristics.

There have been negative reactions towards Anthropotheism, which dates back to Greek philosophy with Xenophanes (540 BCE):

“One God, greatest among gods and humans, like mortals neither in form nor in thought.”

Therianthropy

Therianthropy is the term for humans metamorphosing into animals, and the most obvious example of this within mythology is the Ancient Egyptians and their animal gods. Animals are regarded as representatives or appearances of the deity. It is partially based around the qualities that humans lack, such as speed or strength.

[click below to view gallery]

Animal worship was an important part in Ancient Egyptian religion. Cats were regarded as household deities and a good example of this worship is with the Great Sphinx of Giza – who has the body of a lion and the head of a human – it is the biggest monolith sculpture in the world.

Literature:

There have been many pieces of literature throughout the years that include anthropomorphic characters. These books are known and loved by both children and adults worldwide, and the human personification of these animal characters help the readers empathise with their characters, while still keeping that sense of fantasy.

Alice in Wonderland:

Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’ is a famous tale of a girl, Alice, who finds herself on a surreal adventure in Wonderland, a place that is filled with numerous anthropomorphic animals that twist logical views. The characters have been enormously influential in the fantasy drama, with famous remakes from the likes of Disney and Tim Burton, both of which have their own interpretation on both the film and its characters. The personalities and designs of the characters in the original illustrations are quite psychedelic, leaving them open to many different interpretations.

[click below to view gallery]

The Wind in the Willows

The Wind in the Willows is a classic piece of children’s literature by Kenneth Grahame, focusing on four anthropomorphic characters – Mole, Ratty, Mr.Toad and Mr. Badger – in a pastoral version of England. Due to the setting of the book, interpretations such as films and television series have turned the characters into stereotypical gentlemen of old time England, however, this is also suggested in the original illustrations from the various tweed suits and tuxedos. This means that the characters can also be easily translated into human form, as the BBC did in their television adaption of the book. However the BBC still kept hints of the animal characters within the make-up of the TV series. For example, Mr Toad had a few warts and a slightly protruding brow, whereas Mr. Badger had a dark grey streak running through his white hair.

[click below to view gallery]

Winnie the Pooh

A.A. Milne’s classic children’s book follows the adventures of Christopher Robin and his anthropomorphic animal friends. The storyline’s have been a hit with both adults and children worldwide, as children relate to imagining their stuffed toy animals coming to life, and adults reminisce about that time of youth when it was a possibility to them.

The characters of Winnie the Pooh each have their own human characteristics that are highly relatable. For example – the title character is a natural leader who has a fondness for food, and other characters such as Piglet, Tigger and Eeyore reveal various different traits from being shy to hyperactive – personalities that are found in all walks of life.

Again, Disney have created their own interpretation of Milne’s story and through it have possibly created one of their most iconic animations.

Film and Television

Toy Story Trilogy

The original Toy Story (1995) was the first feature-length computer animated film by Pixar, and is based around a group of anthropomorphic toys that belong to a young boy, Andy. The use of computer animation enabled to the characters to be even more life like and relatable through the more human-like expressions being created through computer generated imagery.

The original film was so well received, that two more followed, delving more into the lives of the toys and how they deal with human issues, such as Andy growing up and leaving for college, and loyalty within friendships.

Cars

Cars is another computer animated film from Pixar, however slightly different to other anthropomorphic characters, as the film is based around an object as opposed to an animal or animal-like toy.

One of Pixar’s expertise is personifying everyday objects, such as cars. They manage to turn their features into faces and create expressions that audiences can relate to – something that is very difficult to achieve.

Human and Animal Evolution

“Until recently the great majority of naturists believed that species were immutable productions, and had been separately created…some few naturalists, on the other hand, have believed that species undergo modification, and that the existing forms of life are the descendants by true generation of pre-existing forms”  (Darwin, C.)

 

Untitled

Bibliography